70’s Punk fashion and its influences (Clothing & hairstyle). Art of a Punk.

THE SHOCK FACTOR… FASHION OF THE PUNKS.

The punk fashion began with the designs of Malcolm McLaren and his girlfriend, Vivienne Westwood, when they brought their designs to the US in hopes that the band, New York Dolls would bring them into style. They brought it back to London and when McLaren became manager of the Sex Pistols, the Let it Rock line became the band’s wardrobe. This began the first of the man fashion statements of teh Punk Movement.

Many of the punk styles often aimed to be as shocking as possible. Mohawks, and many variations, became popular. Piercings, basically anywhere, were in and self-decorated leather jackets were a must. Other than that, any self-made clothing items were usually considered punk as well. (Aiur Media, March 2012)
vivien-front-17090_1718038a

 Vivienne Westwood


Punk fashion is a “deconstruction” as a “culture of waste”
. The punks has pushed on the destruction of the concept of fashion. The look of punks is associated with clothes that have been destroyed or put back together: the inside facing out, unfinished or damaged. Punk was an early manifestation of the concept of deconstruction.

 

Overview of a Punk rocker

The out look of a punk has been influenced by many ideologies and mind-sets of an individual punk. Where most of are much influenced by the acknowledgement of Punk Anarchy, anti-consumerism, anti-Fashion, do it yourself (DIY), individualism and more. Which most of them would purchase charity or second-hand used clothing to avoid consumerism. They would sew band patches on their cut off sleeveless denim with their skinny leather/denim jeans with boots (everything in black). With a touch of unique hair dye with their home-made food colouring products on their Mohawk. Where most of them try to have a unique look for themselves to attract attention from “Commoners”, it is a form of anarchy to raise awareness from the others by making a statement visually.
your-scene-sucks-artwork-23
A look of a typical punk rocker


Here is a 70’s punk youth look book
http://buddhajeans.com/2013/06/21/1970s-punk-youth-culture-and-fashion-look-book/

 

Documentary on how the 70’s punks are influenced

Punk Hairstyles

ro_mat_punk_denik-galerie

The form of punk hairstyles had created an art form, whereby it gives an impression to others by raising their middle finger without doing it physically. One of the most common hairstyle is the Mohawk, but there are also different variations from it. Normally seen in Neon or vibrant colours, either male or female. Apart from the mainstream society, punks share the same idea of anti-fashion and anti-establishment by denoting freedom from their appearance.  One of the well-known hairstyle, liberty spikes  is so named because of the resemblance to the spikes on the head of the statue of liberty.
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Benji Madden from Good Charlotte 

 


References and reading materials

Amy C (2010) ” NHD documentary : how the punk in 70’s influenced fashion”  Available online: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I8Ss_uWZVXY

Aiur Media (2012) ” The Punks of 1970s” Available online: http://thepunksof1970.tumblr.com/[Accessed on 7 July, 2014]

Gaget Girl “Fashion Trends: What Did Punks Wear in The 80s and Punk Fashion Trends Today” Available online: http://gagetgirl.hubpages.com/hub/What-Did-Punks-Wear-in-The-80s [Accessed on 5 July, 2014]

Earnest Lewis (2012) “History of Punk rock Hairstyle Fashion Trends” Available online: http://minute-information.blogspot.com/2012/07/history-of-punk-rock-hairstyle-fashion.html [Accessed on 5 July,2014]

SUWARNAADI (2010)” A brief history of hairstyle trends” Available online: http://coolmenshair.com/2010/05/brief-history-of-punk-hairstyle-trends.html [Accessed on 5 July, 2014]

 

 

 

 

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